The history behind the Egyptian pyramids

So according to the locals, the pyramids were not created by the Hebrews that were enslaved. They actually believe it was the Nubians who built them.

Nubians brought to you by google

Nubians brought to you by google

According to locals, Nubians are actually the indigenous Egyptians. Egypt has been invaded and conquered by almost all the nearby empires, ancient and recent. The average Egyptian has become a mixture of all these influences. I have met a few Nubians in Egypt. The Nubians, tend to look more like Sudanese. They have more darker features and skin color than the average Egyptian. From what I learned from the locals, Sudan is actually where the tradition of burrying the dead in pyramids started.

Map of Ancient Egypt brought to you by Google.

Map of sudan and Egypt being apart of ancient Egypt brought to you by google

As seen in the photos above, Sudan and Egypt were once one country. They eventually broke apart for political and culture differences.

Learning all this was so interesting to me. It’s similar to the native Americans in the USA. Many Nubians in Egypt tend to have thier own communities and customs. However, they play a part of the society and have been heavily influenced by arabization.

Nubian pyramids from the kush empire brought to you by google.

After doing some research on it, I found out that Sudan has more pyramids than Egypt. I know this sounds weird but, let me explain.

Now before ancient Egypt was at it’s full glory, there was an acient empire called Kush. The kush empire was along the Nile, as well. However, it was more south in what’s modern day Sudan. The Kush empire is home of the Nubians. Which are people of the Nubian desert. They had traditions of burrying their dead in pyramids. As seen in the picture above, these sites are the Nubian pyramids and have become a world heritage site.

A cover of a National Geographic magazine brought to you by google.

Eventually, the kush empire conquered Egypt. Which lead to 25 dynasties of having kushite kings as pharaohs. Although, I don’t agree with the title of the magazine as shown above, they did a good of covering this topic. Acient Egypt got it’s traditions of burrying thier dead in pyramids from the Nubians. Also, the pharaohs after the kushites were expelled were black too. They were just more mixed with the other conquerors.

Learning all this made truly made me interested in going back to Africa. It’s a continent with so much history. I truly wish there wasn’t so many issues with countries in Africa. Regardless, an African county should be on everybody’s bucket lists.

Hope one day to go Sudan, and show you all the Nubian pyramids.

Next week, will talk more about the Hebrew/jewish and other religious communities in modern day Egypt.

Thank you for reading. Much love and safe travels!

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17 thoughts on “The history behind the Egyptian pyramids

  1. What an inspiring post. It has much information, especially the part that says Egypt and Sudan were once one country but eventually broke up for political reasons. We can’t even compare Egypt and Sudan today in any way. What could the problem be? Thanks for sharing this post.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Wow, I didn’t know that! I always thought it was Hebrews, I guess coming from a Christian background. I didn’t learn about the empire of Kush until recently, but I did not know that at all.

    Like

  3. An impressive share! I have just forwarded this onto a colleague who was conducting a little homework on this. And he actually ordered me dinner due to the fact that I discovered it for him… lol. So allow me to reword this…. Thank YOU for the meal!! But yeah, thanks for spending some time to discuss this issue here on your website.

    Like

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